Early Childhood Trauma

In a 60 Minutes segment, which aired Sunday, March 11, Oprah Winfrey explored the long-term adverse effects of early childhood trauma with a leading authority in field of early childhood development.  Dr. Bruce Perry, psychiatrist and neuroscientist, discussed the complex issues and the technique of Trauma Informed Care to treat the maltreated and traumatized child.

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Dr. Perry stated, “If you have development trauma, the truth is you’re going to be at risk for almost any kind of physical health, mental health and social health problem that you can think of.”   Most interesting, and sad, is that research in neuroscience shows that “The very same sensitivity that makes you able to learn language ‘just like that!’ as a little infant, makes you highly vulnerable to chaos, threat, inconsistency, unpredictability and violence.  So, children are much more sensitive to developmental trauma than adults.”

A child raised in a healthy, nurturing and stable environment is more likely to have a well-wired brain.  Unfortunately, the reverse is also true.  A child raised in a chaotic home with uncertainty and violence, will have a brain that is wired differently.  Typically, these children are more vulnerable for a lifetime.  In fact, the CDC reports that these individuals are five times as likely to be depressed and have live spans shortened by 20 years.

Dr. Bruce Perry shaped “trauma informed care.” Trauma informed care focuses on “what happened.”  When mental health professionals focus on “What happened to you?” vs. “What’s wrong with you?”  before trying to fix it, it makes the client feel safe.  Under this type of care, clients report, “I felt understood.  I felt seen and heard.”

Dr. Perry points out that we cannot break the cycle without trauma informed care.  Perry says that the difference between a “bad childhood” and a “traumatic childhood” is that somebody helped – that is what makes the difference.

Court Appointed Special Advocates (CASA) for Children is central to fulfilling society’s most fundamental obligation by making sure a qualified, compassionate adult will fight for and protect a child’s right to be safe, to be treated with dignity and respect and to learn and grow in the safe embrace of a loving family. Take a stand against child abuse and join the CASA Movement today!

AtlanticCapeCASA.org
Facebook.com/casa4children   twitter.com/casa4children   (609) 601-7800

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An Inspired Life

Maggie knows first-hand the tumult of a childhood spent in foster care. One of seven children, Maggie entered the foster care system at the age of two. But despite an unstable beginning, she is a remarkable young lady. At the age of 23, she has all the enthusiasm you would expect of one so young. What’s unexpected however, is her wisdom and her commitment to serving people.

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Maggie quickly counts off seven of the foster homes that she remembers; but said she can’t recall too much from her earliest days in care. She also quickly lists off the 12 schools she’s attended which include schools in Alabama, Nebraska, New Jersey and Michigan.

Maggie still carries a hint of her Southern accent. She speaks with deep gratitude of her adoptive parents who would “adopt these little black girls that looked nothing like them.”  She treasures a photo album – the only photos she has from her early childhood – entitled “My Little Margaret” given to her years later by her first grade teacher who was drawn to Maggie’s spirit.

That spirit is what defines Maggie, it guided her though foster care and it is what defines her life now. Unlike so many youth, who spent years in foster care, Maggie was somehow able to break away from the negative outcomes that have overwhelmed many foster youth – dropping out of school, teen pregnancy, homelessness, drug abuse and unemployment.

Certainly, her parents helped shape this young woman’s life by providing a supportive, loving home and giving her the opportunities to thrive. But Maggie attended 12 schools in four different states and still managed to graduate on time, with good grades. Each time a foster youth change schools, they usually loose three to six months of academic progress– which means that Maggie essentially lost 36 months – 3 years – of school, but still managed to graduate with her class. Truly an unbelievable achievement and a testament to Maggie’s remarkable spirit.

Thankfully, Maggie wanted to give back and help other foster youth reach their own potential – she was sworn in as a CASA advocate during her senior year in college. Maggie said, “My experiences as a foster child fuels a lot the reason I am a CASA.”

Just before Maggie’s 22nd birthday, she was assigned a CASA case with two young boys. As their CASA, Maggie ensured that the boys received all the services they needed. Her CASA court reports offered the judge recommendations in the best interest of the boys – which included keeping them together in the same foster home. She is thrilled that her recommendation of keeping the brothers together was ordered by the courts and is even more happy that the boys are now in the process of being adopted into a forever home.

When asked of her experience as a CASA, she admitted that sometimes it’s challenging. “Sometimes people don’t understand the role of a CASA,” Maggie said, “It can be hard to have your calls returned or schedule visits with the kids.” But, Maggie understands what needs to be done, and knows that these children need a CASA volunteer, like her.

“I know that everyone is doing their best, so I am not discouraged by a system that doesn’t always work smoothly, or move as fast as you want it to,” said Maggie. Instead, she is persistent with a positive attitude and a commitment to make sure her CASA children were not just a case number in a file.

“I know in my heart, I made a difference in these brothers’ lives. They are being adopted together, just like me and my sister were, so I know first-hand how important it is to stay with a sibling.”

For Maggie, being a CASA is about breaking the cycle. “You have to try. When you put out consistent effort, there will be the desired effect.”  At a young age, Maggie was inspired by the movie Amazing Grace about the politician, philanthropist and abolitionist, William Wilberforce.  Maggie said, “His passion and concern for other people was an inspiration to me for my life’s ambition of serving others.”

Wasting no time to share her spirit again, Maggie requested another CASA child.  She lights up as she anticipates meeting the 14-year-old girl who will be her next CASA case.  “I’ve always mentored older youth in my community, so I am very excited to meet her and advocate for her!

“I chose CASA because of my personal life experiences as a foster child, and my passion for helping others directly relates to CASA’s mission,” said Maggie. “I never had a CASA while I was in foster care, but I understand the role of a CASA volunteer from growing up for seven years in foster care. It’s a CASA who makes sure the decisions for the child reflect his/her interests, needs and safety and not just the goals or interests of third parties.

“A CASA is an objective advocate that gives special focus to a child or children on an individual level rather than on an institutional level. I want to be that person. I care about the person. I care about people and I want to have an impact on society. I will not be happy at the end of my life unless I have used my life to empower others.”

 

Maggie is one of over 200 CASA Volunteers in Atlantic and Cape May Counties fighting for the rights of children living in foster care. CASA is central to fulfilling society’s most fundamental obligation by making sure a qualified, compassionate adult will fight for and protect a child’s right to be safe, to be treated with dignity and respect and to learn and grow in the safe embrace of a loving family. Take a stand against child abuse and join the CASA Movement today!

AtlanticCapeCASA.org
Facebook.com/casa4children   twitter.com/casa4children   (609) 601-7800