Foster Parenting as a Career

Although controversial, the idea of treating fostering as a full-time paid position, is gaining in popularity. A handful of governments are experimenting with this idea. In 2016 Illinois implemented a pilot program with professional foster parents. Parts of Texas started using professional foster parents in 2017.

Increasingly, children come into foster care with serious behavioral and mental issues. These issues require intensive training and understanding.

Jill Duerr Berrick, professor at the School of Social Welfare at UC – Berkley, states that the idea emerged from a realization that some foster children have extreme needs. Also, over the past 70 years, the number of foster homes have declined significantly. Two parent homes, with a stay at home wife, is no longer the norm as it was in the 1950’s.

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Berrick states “professionalizing foster care isn’t just about the money. It means you’ve been thoughtfully trained and supported to do a good job.”

Retention rates are low for foster parenting. In fact, a study of over 5,000 foster parents showed a 30-50% of foster parents quit within the first 18 months. Half of those cited lack of support and training.

Controversial? Yes. Many believe fostering should remain altruistic. “Kids know the difference between a job and not a job,” Tracey Field is the director/manager of the Child Welfare Strategy Group for the Annie E. Casey Foundation. She feels this model, “really reimagines foster care – but not in a good way.”

Professional foster parents usually foster the children with serious mental, emotional or behavioral issues. In Milwaukee’s Professional Foster Care Program, these children have many appointments throughout the week. This requires a full-time commitment from the foster parent; they cannot hold another job and still support the child’s needs.

Some children feel they are just cash cows when any money is involved. Others feel differently. Heavenly Morrow, lived with professional foster parents in Milwaukee from age 16 – 17; she stated she never felt like her foster parents were in it for the money.

 


Court Appointed Special Advocate (CASA) for Children’s mission to speak on behalf of abused and neglected children is central to fulfilling society’s most fundamental obligation to protect a child’s right to be safe, treated with respect and to help them reach their fullest potential. For more information about CASA, visit AtlanticCapeCASA.org.

 

Local Business Advances CASA Mission

Jen Pierce has a passion…it’s making a difference in the lives of children.  Jen, who is a busy mother and businesswoman in Atlantic County, learned of Court Appointed Special Advocates (CASA), through a friend who was involved. She decided to attend an information session and it was there she learned that by giving to CASA she could make a direct impact in the lives of local children. Jen and her husband had many opportunities in the community to make charitable donations through their business.

“When we learned that there were not enough volunteers for every child who needed advocacy, we decided we could have a much bigger and immediate impact by devoting our resources to children—particularly those in need of advocacy,” says Jen.

Jen also got actively involved in hosting information sessions and events, making others aware of the growing need in Atlantic and Cape May counties. She hosts a table at the awareness and information sessions held regularly by CASA.  The couple also donates a portion of the proceeds from their business through their 3-C Club, an annual customer subscription maintenance service. Jen says it makes their customers feel good about participating in the program when they know that they are contributing to CASA.

Group of Diverse Multiethnic People Teamwork

“We are able to raise awareness through our customer base too and that makes us feel good,” Jen says. Jen notes that it is really gratifying to know that now every child who needs one can have a CASA. “Through no fault of their own, these children may be in situations that prevent them from living up to their full potential. No matter how big or small the donation of money or time, it can still impact the children in positive ways,” says Jen.  “We want to make sure that CASA can provide an advocate for every child who needs one.”

 


Clay’s Climate Control LLC is a family-owned and operated company located in Linwood, NJ. The company was founded by Clay and Jen Pierce in 2001 based on the principle that we could offer an excellent HVAC experience to our customers.

Court Appointed Special Advocate (CASA) for Children’s mission to speak on behalf of abused and neglected children is central to fulfilling society’s most fundamental obligation to protect a child’s right to be safe, treated with respect and to help them reach their fullest potential. For more information about CASA, visit AtlanticCapeCASA.org.