National Volunteer Week: CASA Volunteers Listen First. Then They Act.

In honor of National Volunteer Week, I wanted to take a moment to thank everyone doing extraordinary things through service.

This week honors the people and organizations that use volunteerism as a way to tackle society’s toughest challenges, spark change, and build stronger, more resilient communities.

Volunteers1

Court Appointed Special Advocates (CASA) for Children of Atlantic and Cape May Counties is fortunate to count over 200 community volunteers working on behalf of children in foster care.

Nobody longs for a safe and loving family more than a child in foster care. As a court-appointed special advocate (CASA) volunteer, you are empowered by the courts to help make this dream a reality. CASA Volunteers not only bring positive change to the lives of these vulnerable children, but also their children and generations to come. In addition, in doing so, you will enrich your life as well.

Volunteers get to know the child by talking with everyone in that child’s life: parents and relatives, foster parents, teachers, medical professionals, attorneys, social workers and others. They use the information they gather to inform judges and others of what the child needs and what will be the best permanent home for them.

Nearly 700,000 children experience abuse or neglect each year. Instead of playing with neighbors and making happy family memories, they are attending court hearings, adjusting to new foster homes and transitioning to new schools. That is a heavy burden for a child to carry. With a Court Appointed Special Advocate (CASA) volunteer dedicated to their case, America’s most vulnerable children will have someone speaking up for their best interests. With your support, more children will have the opportunity to thrive in a safe and loving home.

You do not have to be a lawyer or a social worker to be a volunteer. We welcome people from all walks of life. We are simply looking for people who care about children and have common sense. As a volunteer, you are thoroughly trained and well supported by experienced advocates and professional staff to help you through each case.

Ready to Stand Up for a Child Who Needs You?

National Volunteer Week is a great time to get involved!  Volunteer Your Time to Change a Child’s Life: find out how by visiting www.AtlanticCapeCASA.org

Advertisements

Early Childhood Trauma

In a 60 Minutes segment, which aired Sunday, March 11, Oprah Winfrey explored the long-term adverse effects of early childhood trauma with a leading authority in field of early childhood development.  Dr. Bruce Perry, psychiatrist and neuroscientist, discussed the complex issues and the technique of Trauma Informed Care to treat the maltreated and traumatized child.

pexels-photo-236215

Dr. Perry stated, “If you have development trauma, the truth is you’re going to be at risk for almost any kind of physical health, mental health and social health problem that you can think of.”   Most interesting, and sad, is that research in neuroscience shows that “The very same sensitivity that makes you able to learn language ‘just like that!’ as a little infant, makes you highly vulnerable to chaos, threat, inconsistency, unpredictability and violence.  So, children are much more sensitive to developmental trauma than adults.”

A child raised in a healthy, nurturing and stable environment is more likely to have a well-wired brain.  Unfortunately, the reverse is also true.  A child raised in a chaotic home with uncertainty and violence, will have a brain that is wired differently.  Typically, these children are more vulnerable for a lifetime.  In fact, the CDC reports that these individuals are five times as likely to be depressed and have live spans shortened by 20 years.

Dr. Bruce Perry shaped “trauma informed care.” Trauma informed care focuses on “what happened.”  When mental health professionals focus on “What happened to you?” vs. “What’s wrong with you?”  before trying to fix it, it makes the client feel safe.  Under this type of care, clients report, “I felt understood.  I felt seen and heard.”

Dr. Perry points out that we cannot break the cycle without trauma informed care.  Perry says that the difference between a “bad childhood” and a “traumatic childhood” is that somebody helped – that is what makes the difference.

Court Appointed Special Advocates (CASA) for Children is central to fulfilling society’s most fundamental obligation by making sure a qualified, compassionate adult will fight for and protect a child’s right to be safe, to be treated with dignity and respect and to learn and grow in the safe embrace of a loving family. Take a stand against child abuse and join the CASA Movement today!

AtlanticCapeCASA.org
Facebook.com/casa4children   twitter.com/casa4children   (609) 601-7800